The Foundation for Historical Louisiana

Plan Your Visit

You are invited to Louisiana's White House!


The Old Governor's Mansion, built under the governorship of the famous (and infamous) Huey P. Long in 1930, served as the official residence to nine Louisiana governors and their families between 1930 and 1962. It is now a historic house museum listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Stop by for a tour of Louisiana's White House and hear fascinating stories of Huey P. Long and some of Louisiana's other colorful governors!

Guided tours are available Tuesday through Friday: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The last tour begins at 3:00 p.m.

The Mansion is closed on major holidays.  

    Adults $10
    Seniors (62 or over) $9
    Students (K-12) $8
    Children under 5 Free
    FHL or NTHP Members Free

Group tours are available by reservation. Please call our Director of Education at (225) 387-2464, ext. 4. Special rates apply for group tours.

 

Directions to the Old Governor's Mansion

The Old Governor's Mansion is Located at 502 North Boulevard in the historic Beauregard Town neighborhood of downtown Baton Rouge. 

Coming from the North or East: Take I-10 W to I-110 S. Exit at LA-73/Government St toward River Center/Downtown (left-side exit 1A off I-110 S). Turn right onto Government Street. Turn right onto St. Charles Street. Turn right onto North Blvd.

Coming from the South or West: Take I-10 E to I-110 N. Exit at Convention Street toward Downtown (left-side exit 1B off I-10 E/I-110 N). Turn left from Convention Street onto 6th Street. 

Parking

Parking is available in front of the Old Governor's Mansion on North Blvd. between St. Charles/5th Street and Royal Street/6th Street.

Additional visitor parking (no buses) is available in the circular drive in front of the Old Governor's Mansion. 

Motorcoach parking available on North Boulevard in front of Mansion.

The Mansion is handicapped accessible.

 

Contact Information

For questions, please contact the Museum Curator and Director of Education at 225.387.2464, ext. 4. 

Weddings & Events

      Photo: Richard Alan Hannon

We are pleased to offer the Old Governor's Mansion as a unique and elegant setting for your special event.

Built in 1930 by Governor Huey P. Long, this splendid Georgian-style Mansion will enchant you and your guests with its timeless amenities, including elaborate crystal chandeliers, a marble and wrought iron staircase, and a romantic rose garden. Antique furnishings and a state-of-the-art restoration are beautifully blended to create the perfect venue for memorable occasions.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Mansion provides a magnificent setting for your bridal celebrations:

            • Engagement Parties
            • Bridal Portrait
            • Bridal Luncheon
            • Rehearsal Dinner
            • Wedding Ceremony
            • Wedding Reception
            • Formal Bridal Photos

The Mansion offers the expertise of our professional event staff to make this an unforgettable experience. Conveniently located in historic downtown Baton Rouge, the Old Governor's Mansion offers complimentary parking, on-site security, and a private bride's dressing room. Your personal Mansion Coordinator will help to ensure your special day meets all of your dreams and expectations.

Please contact our Special Events Director, Allie Wester, at 225-387-2464 or alliewester@fhl.org, for a private showing of this splendid facility.

Come join us at the Something Old, Something New Bridal Show on Thursday, January 26, 2017 from 6-9 pm at the Old Governor's Mansion!

Opportunities with Preserve Louisiana

Preserve Louisina Seeks Business Development Manager

OVERVIEW


The mission of Preserve Louisiana is to promote the preservation of the cultural and architectural heritage of Louisiana through education, advocacy, and stewardship.

We are currently seeking a Business Development Manager to oversee member and client relationships and outreach that will increase sustainable investments in support FHL’s mission and strategic priorities. This position reports directly to the Executive Director.


FHL looks to hire a Business Development Manager with the interest and ability to build donor, client and member relationships; strengthen our special events program, facilitate and increase Old Governor’s Mansion rentals, increase the number of renewed and newly-cultivated partnerships; and support FHL’s progress toward an increasingly diverse approach to cultural/historic preservation in our state.

This person must have a strong background in client/donor services, data management, special events execution with an excellent attention to detail.

Required skills and experience:

·        Experience in special events including planning and marketing
·        Membership administration
·        Experience with application and management of sensitive and complex financial data
·        Exceptional communication and client/donor/member service skills
·        Respect for data accuracy; initiative, project energy and enthusiasm
·        Must be self-motivated, energetic, and able to work under pressure, organized, reliable, and detail-oriented
·        Must be able to interact effectively with all levels of staff, clients, volunteers, vendors, members and donors, and work as a part of a busy, committed team
·        Must be able to work independently and manage multiple tasks
·        Excellent computer skills required including Microsoft Office in Windows, Excel and other database management.  Must be willing and able to learn new applications where needed

Job responsibilities:

Special Events
Provide leadership, professional expertise, and direction in the planning and execution of high quality events on behalf of clients and the organization
Develop and execute plan to increase Mansion rentals
Execute membership program related events
Research opportunities for revenue growth for FHL in the area of special events
Membership Activities

Coordinate joining and renewal process for members
Prepare and send membership materials and acknowledgement letters for new, renewing members, and prospective members; and assist in creation of new contact materials
Maintain member and volunteer records
Develop and execute member communications plan

Client & Donor Support

Establish relationships with clients of the tax incentive program and assist with communications as needed
Connect with members through communications and events
Assist Executive Director in fund development initiatives including prospect research and grant writing and reporting

Compensation

Full-time position supervised by the Executive Director
Salary based on experience and performance

FHL is an equal opportunity employer.

How to Apply / Contact
Send a cover letter and resume to Fairleigh Jackson, Executive Director of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana:
fairleighjackson@fhl.org
No calls, please.

Opportunities with FHL

FHL Seeks Business Development Manager

OVERVIEW


The mission of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana is to promote the preservation of the cultural and architectural heritage of Louisiana through education, advocacy, and stewardship.

We are currently seeking a Business Development Manager to oversee member and client relationships and outreach that will increase sustainable investments in support FHL’s mission and strategic priorities. This position reports directly to the Executive Director.


FHL looks to hire a Business Development Manager with the interest and ability to build donor, client and member relationships; strengthen our special events program, facilitate and increase Old Governor’s Mansion rentals, increase the number of renewed and newly-cultivated partnerships; and support FHL’s progress toward an increasingly diverse approach to cultural/historic preservation in our state.

This person must have a strong background in client/donor services, data management, special events execution with an excellent attention to detail.

Required skills and experience:

·        Experience in special events including planning and marketing
·        Membership administration
·        Experience with application and management of sensitive and complex financial data
·        Exceptional communication and client/donor/member service skills
·        Respect for data accuracy; initiative, project energy and enthusiasm
·        Must be self-motivated, energetic, and able to work under pressure, organized, reliable, and detail-oriented
·        Must be able to interact effectively with all levels of staff, clients, volunteers, vendors, members and donors, and work as a part of a busy, committed team
·        Must be able to work independently and manage multiple tasks
·        Excellent computer skills required including Microsoft Office in Windows, Excel and other database management.  Must be willing and able to learn new applications where needed

Job responsibilities:

Special Events
Provide leadership, professional expertise, and direction in the planning and execution of high quality events on behalf of clients and the organization
Develop and execute plan to increase Mansion rentals
Execute membership program related events
Research opportunities for revenue growth for FHL in the area of special events
Membership Activities

Coordinate joining and renewal process for members
Prepare and send membership materials and acknowledgement letters for new, renewing members, and prospective members; and assist in creation of new contact materials
Maintain member and volunteer records
Develop and execute member communications plan

Client & Donor Support

Establish relationships with clients of the tax incentive program and assist with communications as needed
Connect with members through communications and events
Assist Executive Director in fund development initiatives including prospect research and grant writing and reporting

Compensation

Full-time position supervised by the Executive Director
Salary based on experience and performance

FHL is an equal opportunity employer.

How to Apply / Contact
Send a cover letter and resume to Fairleigh Jackson, Executive Director of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana:
fairleighjackson@fhl.org
No calls, please.

Professional Preservation Services

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana offers services to communities, businesses, and homeowners in the hopes of promoting historical preservation through design and renovations. Our Director of Preservation Field Services works in many areas to achieve this goal.

Services Include:

Historic Preservation Tax Incentives Assistance

Basic Explanation of Programs
Part 1: Determination of Eligibility
Part 2: Description of Proposed Renovation/Restoration
Part 3:  Request for Certification of Completed Work
Design Assistance

Architectural drawings for planning and illustration purposes (not for construction)
Design assistance and associated architectural drawings and plans could be used in Part 2 of Tax Credit Assistance.
Design assistance would also be beneficial to property owners wanting to restore the facades/porches of their homes or businesses.    
Design Guidelines for Municipalities, Historic Districts, and Neighborhoods

Basic Outline of Existing Conditions in Designated Area
Tasks may include an architectural survey, historical research of area, an illustrated list of common attributes and significant neighborhood characteristics, etc.
Publication of prepared survey, research, significant neighborhood characteristics, etc.
Creation of an illustrated guidebook of the proposed guidelines
After thorough analysis of existing conditions and input from interested parties, a publication with design guidelines and illustrations will be produced for the designated area.
National Register Nominations

Research, Document, and Complete a National Register nomination form for a for-profit entity such as a developer and property owner who is looking to make his property eligible to receive Federal and/or State Historic Tax Credits.

 

If you would like more information on our preservation serives, please email our Executive Director, Fairleigh Jackson, at fairleighjackson@fhl.org.

FHL Snapshot

Important Charity Hospital Links

The Charity Hospital Proposal Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcVTGIrx0ZU

The FHL Charity Hospital Full Feasibility Study
http://fhl.org/uploads/files/09-15_Charityl_Feasibility.pdf

FHL Charity Hospital Study – Executive Summary
http://fhl.org/uploads/files/ExecutiveSummary_Public.pdf

Founders and Past Presidents

Our Founders

Mrs. Heidel Brown
Mrs. Roger M. Fritchie
Mrs. James H. Hynes
Mrs. G.T. Owen, Jr.
Mr. Edward Overton Perkins
Mrs. V.R. Perkins
Mrs. G.C. Reeves
Mrs. E. Leland Richardson
Mrs. Homer D. Spaht
Mrs. Frank M. Womack


Our Past Presidents and Chairs

Overton Perkins, 1963-1965
Evelyn   Thom, 1965-1967
Magnolia Newsom, 1967-1968
Robert Heck, 1968-1972
Joan Samuel, 1972-1974
Veda Norfolk, 1974-1976
Winifred Byrd, 1976-1977
Connie Ogden, 1977-1978
Wanda Barber, 1978-1979
Jean Kirby, 1979-1980
Kay Calcote, 1980-1981
Lucile Munson, 1981-1982
Marilyn Davis, 1982-1983
Gwen Cook, 1983-1984
Nathalie diBenedetto, 1984-1986
Charlotte Smith, 1986-1988
Robert Hodges, 1988-1990
Lorice Say, 1990-1992
Ira Paul Babin, 1992-1994
George Jenne, 1994-2000
John W. Wilbert, Jr., 2000-2004
Darryl Gissel, 2004-2007
Lenore Feeny, 2007-2009
Mark Upton, 2009-2011
Doug Cochran, 2011-2015

Mark Upton 2015-Present

Magnolia Cemetery and the Battle of Baton Rouge

Magnolia Cemetery

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana is the keeper of the records for burials in Magnolia Cemetery. If you are interested in researching the location of a burial in Magnolia Cemetery, please contact us at info@fhl.org or 225.387.2464.

Civil War Brochure Available for Download.

Battle of Baton Rouge

Baton Rouge in 1860 was a town “on the make,” full of merchants, store clerks, lawyers, doctors, planters, and others who saw opportunity in this busy river port, Louisiana’s new “capital city.” The state capitol building, a glistening white castle along the Mississippi River, was itself less than a decade old. Throughout the year it housed the offices of the state government as well as the legislature when in session. Baton Rouge, the new center of political power in Louisiana, appeared as an attractive place to re-locate for many. In fact, by 1860 more than 5400 people called the town home, almost triple the number from just 15 or 20 years earlier. It was a diverse crowd, too. These new people had come from other parts of the South, New England, the Mid-West, and even overseas, especially from Ireland, England, and Germany. African Americans, mostly enslaved but also including several hundred free people of color, composed more than a quarter of the town’s total population. It was a bustling world, this Baton Rouge, but soon to witness great tragedy and radical change in the coming war.

The reasons for the Civil War are complex but ultimately devolve onto the basic issue of slavery and politics. The burning question had to be answered: would the free North or the slave South control the destiny of the nation? The 1850s had seen a heated political contest between the two sections. The new Republican Party, based completely in the North, viewed slavery as immoral and advocated limiting its expansion into the West. Southerners believed that slavery had to expand and were insulted by attacks on their morality and honor. In November 1860, Republican leader Abraham Lincoln was elected to the Presidency without a single vote from the South. With this, it became clear to southern leaders that they had lost the political fight. Lincoln indeed believed slavery to be morally wrong and wanted to limit its growth. Still, he believed that the U.S. Constitution protected slavery as a form of property where it existed. He therefore had no plans to abolish the institution, only to control its spread. For southerners, though, his election was the last straw. At that moment, the only logical solution for them appeared to be secession - withdrawal from the Union.

As a river town dependent on trade and commerce, Baton Rouge was cautious about the idea of secession. But pro-secession forces, the so-called “fire-eaters,” ruled the day. In early January 1861, Governor Thomas O. Moore ordered the seizure of Federal property in the state, including the weapons and ammunition housed at the U.S. Arsenal in Baton Rouge. Late in the month, a special convention of elected delegates met at the state capitol (today’s Old State Capitol) and voted to officially leave the Union. It was a hard decision for many; one delegate called it “the bitterest pill I ever took.” That February, Louisiana joined the other Deep South states to form a new government, the Confederate States of America. In April, war erupted when Confederate forces opened fire on the Union soldiers at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Many of the local boys here in Baton Rouge enlisted in military companies such as the Fencibles, Pelicans, and Creole Guards, and went off to the fight with bands playing, flags flying, and dreams of glory floating about their heads. A great many would not return.

Abraham Lincoln and his military advisors realized that control of the Mississippi would determine their ultimate success in winning the war. They made its conquest a top priority. By early May 1862, the U.S. Navy had blasted through the Confederate defenses at New Orleans to the south and

Memphis to the north; only the fortress at Vicksburg remained outside Union control. Here at Baton Rouge, the mayor surrendered the town to the Union fleet when it steamed by, but no troops remained to occupy the place. Later in May, when Confederate guerillas fired at a boat of Union sailors coming ashore, navy ships shelled the waterfront, causing mass panic among local civilians and serious damage to buildings. A brigade of U.S. soldiers then arrived to hold the town. By early August, Confederate forces had massed in an attempt to re-take Louisiana’s capital. On August 5th, 1862, General John C. Breckinridge, a former Vice-President of the United States, led his men in an attack on the town. It was a bloody fight, this Battle of Baton Rouge, but an inconclusive one. Close to 200 men were killed outright or died shortly after; another 650 were wounded or missing. Each side appeared traumatized. The Union army eventually evacuated to New Orleans two weeks later, giving the town over to the Confederates. It was a short-lived re-occupation, though, as the Confederate troops soon moved to the more strategic Port Hudson position a dozen miles upriver. Union soldiers returned to Baton Rouge that December and would remain in Baton Rouge through the end of the war.

The Union occupation got off to a bad start. Right after Christmas 1862, the state capitol went up in flames, leaving a hulking wreck that would haunt the town for the next two decades. By that time, though, most inhabitants had fled or “refugeed” to western Louisiana or Texas. The town became a military garrison, with the Union navy and army using it as a staging point for its operations against Port Hudson in 1863 and up the Red River into central and northwest Louisiana in 1864. Thousands of soldiers and sailors passed through the place. Public buildings and private homes became makeshift officers’ quarters, enlisted men’s barracks, or hospital wards. From the countryside, thousands of African Americans, making a bid for freedom, poured in seeking the protection of the United States flag. Union officers organized the men into labor gangs, paying them wages for their work, or enlisted them into the army’s all-black regiments to fight against their former masters. It was a revolutionary experience, and one that spelled the end of slavery.

Eventually, the war came to an end in the spring of 1865 with the surrender of the South. By this point, Louisiana had a new state constitution, the Constitution of 1864, and slavery had been abolished. Confederate soldiers straggled home while civilian refugees likewise attempted to pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. In Baton Rouge, new and old businesses re-opened, the newspapers began publication once more, and whites and blacks adjusted as best they could to the radically different social and political order that would mark their lives in the coming decades.

Louisiana Preservation Organizations

Abbeville, Vermilion Historical Society

Alexandria, Alexandria Historic Preservation Commission

Baker, Baker Heritage Center

Baton Rouge, Foundation for Historical Louisiana

Baton Rouge, Le Comite Des Archives

Baton Rouge, Los Islenos De Galvez Heritage and Cultural Society

Baton Rouge, Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation

Gretna, Gretna Historical Society

Jackson, Jackson Historic District Commission

Lafayette, Lafayette Parish Bayou Vermilion District

Lafayette, Louisiana Historical Association

Lake Charles, Calcasieu Historical Preservation Society

Minden, Dorcheat Historical Association & Museum, Inc.

Natchitoches, National Center for Preservation Technology

Natchitoches, Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches

New Orleans, Louisiana Historical Society

New Orleans, DOCOMOMO

New Orleans, Louisiana Landmarks Society

New Orleans, Preservation Resource Center

Shreveport, Highland Restoration Association

Shreveport, Rental Association of Highland

Shreveport, Shreveport Historic Preservation Society

Shreveport, Fairfield Historic District Association

St. Francisville , West Feliciana Historical Society

Sulphur, Brimstone Historical Society

Westwego, Westwego Historical Society

National Preservation Organizations

DOCOMOMO:  http://www.docomomo-us.org/

National Alliance of Preservation Commissions: http://www.uga.edu/napc/

National Center for Preservation Technology & Training: http://www.ncptt.nps.gov/

National Council for Preservation Education:  http://www.ncpe.us/

National Park Service: http://www.nps.gov/communities/index.htm

National Preservation Institute: http://www.npi.org/

National Trust for Historic Preservation: http://www.preservationnation.org/

The Nature Conservancy: http://www.nature.org/

Historic Preservation Tax Incentives

The Louisiana Division of Historic Preservation administers the Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit in conjunction with the National Park Service (NPS) and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and two State tax credits in conjunction with the Louisiana Department of Revenue (LDR). The purpose of tax credits is to encourage the preservation of historic buildings through incentives to support rehabilitation of historic and older buildings. Since the inception of the Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit, Louisiana has been a leader in certified tax credit projects, generating over $2 billion in private reinvestment in Louisiana communities. The State Commercial Tax Credit has leveraged more than $350 million in private reinvestment in Louisiana Downtown Development Districts and Cultural Districts.

What is a tax credit?
A tax credit is a direct, dollar for dollar, reduction in the amount of money a taxpayer must pay in taxes for a given year. For example, if a taxpayer owes $5,000 in taxes to the Internal Revenue Service, but has a $3,000 credit, he only pays $2,000. Thus he pockets the $3,000 he would otherwise have to pay in taxes. A credit is much better than a deduction which merely reduces a taxpayer’s income and puts him in a lower tax bracket.

For more information, please visit these sites:

National Register of Historic Places

Honor: It is a great honor for a property to be listed on the prestigious National Register of Historic Places. This status can be very useful in helping to save historic buildings and sites because people typically hold Register properties in high regard and think twice about insensitive alteration and demolition.

Protection: The National Register program also provides a measure of protection from federally assisted projects. For more information, visit the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation’s web site.

Financial: There are several financial incentive programs available for National Register-listed properties in Louisiana:

Federal and State Tax Incentives

Louisiana Main Street Program

Louisiana Main Street is a community-driven revitalization program designed to promote the historic and economic redevelopment of traditional commercial districts in Louisiana. The Main Street program improves all aspects of downtown, producing both tangible and intangible benefits. Improving economic management, strengthening public participation, and making downtown a fun place to visit are as critical to Main Street's future as recruiting new businesses and rehabilitating buildings.

The program uses four guiding principles to achieve community revitalization: organization, promotion, design, and economic restructuring.

Click here for more information.

Louisiana Cultural Districts

A "Cultural District" as defined by law is a district designated by a Local Governing Authority for the purpose of revitalizing a community by creating a hub of cultural activity, by offering communities opportunities to create or rebuild cultural destinations.

By Louisiana law a Cultural District must:

  • Be geographically contiguous
  • Be distinguished by cultural resources that play a vital role in the life and cultural development of a community
  • Focus on an existing cultural anchor such as a major art institution, art and entertainment businesses, an area or business with arts and cultural activities or cultural or artisan production
  • Be engaged in the promotion, preservation, and educational aspects of the arts and culture of the locale
  • Contribute to the public through interpretive and educational uses
  • Encourage opportunity for affordable artist housing and work space

Benefits:

Once a Cultural District is certified two tax incentives take effect:

  1. The sales of original, one-of-a-kind works of art are exempt from local and state sales tax.
  2. Renovations to historic structures within the district may be eligible for residential and commercial state historic income tax credits.

Similar programs in other states have resulted in increased occupancy, property renovations, a sense of community identity, increased social activity and jobs.

For more information click here.

For a map of Cultural Districts click here.

K-12 Tours & Programs

                                                                                                                  Photo: Richard Alan Hannon

 

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana offers educational tours that are appropriate for grades 3-12. 

 

GUIDED TOURS

Available Tuesday-Friday, 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Standard Tour of the Old Governor’s Mansion (1 hour)
GRADES 3-12

The Old Governor’s Mansion is a historic house museum built in 1930 under the governorship of Huey P. Long. As students move through the Old Governor’s Mansion, they will learn about some of the people, issues, and events that shaped Louisiana in the early twentieth century. An optional scavenger hunt is available that encourages critical thinking and observation. $4 per student. We require one adult per 10 students. The required adult chaperones receive complimentary admission. All additional adults are $8 each.

Special Exhibition Tours (30 minutes)

GRADES 3-12

Add to your experience at the Old Governor’s Mansion by exploring the rotating special exhibition. Students will examine imagery and artifacts featuring Louisiana’s history, culture, architecture, and preservation, while participating in engaging, multidisciplinary discussions, and exploring primary and secondary resources. Add-On Feature: Additional $2 per student. No additional charge per adult.

To schedule a tour, please contact the Director of Education at 225.387.2464 ext. 4; Natalie @ FHL.org.

 

Foundation for Historical Louisiana Educational Programs are sponsored in part by the Charles Lamar Family Foundation.

Tours

Preserve Louisiana is honored to act as the steward of the Old Governor's Mansion.

Tours are offered Tuesday - Friday, 10 am - 3:00 pm. Please call in advace to be sure we can accomodate your group, 225.387.2464.

 

Bilingual guides are available.

 

Testimonials

My husband and I visited Baton Rouge for two days while touring the gulf coast states. We stopped off on Friday, Oct. 18 for what we thought would be a self-directed tour and were pleasantly surprised to learn that a docent was onsite to assist us on our journey to learn more about the mansion. As luck would have it we were the only two tourists at that time of day and we got a "private" tour - what a treat! Your docent was so well informed, personable and had such good people skills that I would say that tour ranked as one of my top two - the only other tour which stands out as favorably in my mind is an experience at Hearst Castle many years ago.

I am embarrassed to say that I cannot remember our tour guides name, but he was retired, about 5'7" tall and had gray hair. I would appreciate it if you would please extend our sincere appreciation to him for the wonderful experience he provided during our visit. That man is a treasure!

Susan Williams-Dixon
Grass Valley, CA

About the Old Governor’s Mansion

                                                                                                                                         Photo: Richard Alan Hannon                

 

HISTORY OF LOUISIANA'S OLD GOVERNOR'S MANSION

The Louisiana Old Governor’s Mansion was built in 1929-1930 under the governorship of Huey P. Long, its first resident. Building the Old Governor’s Mansion cost almost $150,000, plus an additional $22,000 (a princely sum during the Great Depression years) for the finest damask and velvet drapes, crystal chandeliers, hand printed French wallpaper, and other fine appointments.

The Old Governor’s Mansion served as a residence to nine governors until 1962, when a new mansion was constructed just east of the New State Capitol building. In 1964, the Old Governor’s Mansion became the home of the Louisiana Arts & Science Museum (then, Louisiana Arts & Science Center) and served as the headquarters for the Museum until 1976.

In 1978, the Mansion was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Mansion underwent restoration from 1996-1998, and opened as a historic house museum in 1999. 

Today, the Old Governor’s Mansion serves as a historic house museum about the lives of the nine governors who lived here, as the headquarters for the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, and as a venue for special events.

 

LOUISIANA'S WHITE HOUSE

The Louisiana Old Governor’s Mansion is reported to be inspired by the White House as it was originally designed by Thomas Jefferson. It is said that Long wanted to be familiar with the White House in Washington when he became president, so he had the White House duplicated in Baton Rouge. 

Many of the features of Louisiana’s Old Governor's Mansion are reminiscent of those in the ornate White House in Washington, D. C.: Both structures have a portico supported by four smooth columns; both have similar entrance rooms, east rooms, west wings for office spaces, and state dining rooms on their first floors; both have oval rooms on their second floors, as well as east wing guest bedrooms; there is a stairway with a beautiful, large curving marble staircase with a fancy wrought iron banister; and the floor of the stair hall is black-and-white checked marble).

 

THE GOVERNOR'S WHO LIVED HERE

The Old Governor’s Mansion served as a residence to nine governors between the years of 1930 (its completion) and 1962 (the completion of the new governor’s mansion).

In 1963, Governor Jimmy Davis moved into the present governor’s mansion near the State Capitol, ending the Old Governor’s Mansion’s 32 years as the official residence of Louisiana’s top executive.

The governors who lived in the Old Governor’s Mansion and their terms of office are:

               Huey Pierce Long                     1928-32
               Alvin Olin King                           1932
               Oscar Kelly Allen                      1932-36
               James Albert Noe                     1936
               Richard Webster Leche           1936-39
               Earl Kemp Long                        1939-40; 1948-52; 1956-60
               Sam Houston Jones                 1940-44
              James Houston Davis               1944-48; 1960-64
              Robert Floyd Kennon                1952-56

Advocacy

More information coming soon! 

Preservation Awards

"Making the Past Known and Useful to the Future"

Since 1976 Preservel Louisiana has honored individuals and entities that exemplify the mission of FHL - to preserve, protect, and promote the cultural and architectural heritage of Louisiana.

 

To nominate a person or entity for a Preservation Award, please click on the form below and submit it via email to info@fhl.org or by mail to 502 North Boulevard Baton Rouge, LA 70802. 


 

FHL would like to thank our underwriter for this program,

Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann LLC

Current Projects

LSU Huey P. Long Pool and Fieldhouse

The Huey P. Long Fieldhouse, completed in 1932, is one of the original buildings on the Louisiana State University (LSU) campus. Built under Long's leadership, the Fieldhouse was the original student union, with a ballroom, soda fountain, post office, beauty parlor, barber shop, racquetball courts, and outdoor swimming pool. The architecture illustrates the University's evolution from a humble agricultural state school to a prestigious institution of higher education—strong, elegant, and a site to behold.

Long was something of a showboat, and insisted his pool be longer than any other pool in the country, so it was built 181 feet long (1 foot longer than the standard pool). The water from the pool was furnished by artisan wells. The pool was often described as having the appearance of a "Roman Bath," due to its beautiful architectural details.

The Fieldhouse was designed by the same architectural firm that designed the Old State Capitol and governor's mansion. The building is listed in the state and National Register of Historic Places, as part of the LSU Historic District nomination. According to the state nomination form, the building is significant "because it embodies distinctive characteristics of a type of period, and method of construction that represents the work of a master and possesses high artistic value."

From 1932 until the 1970s, the HPL pool hosted many swim lessons for students of all ages, and it was required that LSU students complete a swim class during their tenure at the University. In 1988 the men's swim team, which trained at the HPL pool, won the Southeastern Conference championship. Unfortunately, since the 1960s the Huey P. Long pool has suffered from lack of maintenance. The pool was drained and finally closed around 1999.

The pool’s significance lies not only in its exceptional construction and mechanics, but also for its impact on the lives of university students. In a Reveille article from August of 1944 the Fieldhouse was described as a place, “where old friends gather, new friends meet, dates are made, and sometimes broken.” However, the pool was not just a purely recreational attraction, it was also used to help treat polio–stricken children and was the home of mandatory swimming classes for each university student. The pool became the battleground for segregation debate in the summer of 1964. In a Reveille article from June 1964, it was announced that an earthquake had damaged the pool and forced it to close indefinitely. When University President John Hunter declared that the pool would reopen solely as a teaching facility and would no longer be accessible to students, it sparked a huge controversy over speculation as to the real reason why it had been closed. The summer of 1964 was the first time that African American students had been admitted to the university, and several of these students had been denied access to the swimming pool and to other Fieldhouse amenities. During this time, it was standard procedure in the South to integrate but not to allow integration in social functions. The Fieldhouse pool was unceremoniously reopened in April of 1965, without major incident.

For  more information on the current status of the pool, click here

 

The Historic Lincoln Theater

The Lincoln Theater (ca. 1950) is a two story brick veneer-over-concrete building located at the corner of Myrtle Walk and Eddie Robinson Street in a modest early to mid-twentieth century neighborhood about a half mile southeast of downtown Baton Rouge. Although in disrepair, the original marquee is still quite prominent on the front façade and could easily be restored, as could the original roof signage with the profile of Abraham Lincoln.

The theater contains its original stage and also commercial shopfront bays. Historically these spaces housed a barber shop, a laundry, and a pharmacy. The commercial spaces back up to the theater space, sharing a common wall.  The barber shop is in an excellent state of preservation from the historic period. It retains its original sinks, metal cabinets, mirrors, recessed lighting and black and white checkerboard linoleum floor.
   
The Lincoln Theater was placed on the National Register in December of 2010 due to its significance as an important entertainment focal point for Baton Rouge’s large African American population. Additionally, it represents an important phenomenon – the development of first-class theaters in black neighborhoods specifically for African Americans. These entertainment meccas were of real and symbolic value in the segregated world of separate but typically unequal.

Baton Rouge city directories show the Lincoln under construction in the 1950 volume. The 1951 city directory lists the Lincoln Theater, Lincoln Pharmacy, and Lincoln Barbershop at the building’s address. The facility was built by Dr. A. L. Chatman, a local African American physician. Dr. Chatman was also responsible for the construction of the Lincoln Hotel, also in Baton Rouge.

When the theater opened, it was one of three African American theaters in the City of Baton Rouge. Black neighborhood theaters such as these were built either by white businessmen who saw an economic opportunity or by African Americans themselves. Obviously, African Americans preferred welcoming neighborhood theaters over the “colored” balcony of one of the city’s white theaters, accessed by a secondary “colored” entrance. As historians of segregation have observed, blacks daily had to deal with various indignities and humiliation – from seats at the back of the bus, to separate drinking fountains, to separate entrances, and seats in the balcony. By its very nature, segregation implied inferiority.

When asked what distinguished the Lincoln from the city’s other two African American theaters, one woman spoke for many when she said, it was “the modern thing.” Another person interviewed quickly replied “because it was a first class theater.” The Lincoln was the newest, most up-to-date of the three. Roscoe Perry, whose father was the Lincoln’s first projectionist, explained that sometime in the 1950s, the theater became even more up-to-date when it acquired a larger screen with cinemascope projection.

News

Latest News coming soon.

Events

Stay tuned with what's happening at FHL by checking back here often!

News & Events

Read about upcoming events and any Preserve Louisiana news by following the links below. Information can also be found on the Foundation's Facebook page here

Sponsorship Opportunities

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana could not champion the cause of preservation in this great state without the support of our members and the financial contributions of the following individuals and companies. These donations insure the preservation of Louisiana's rich historical heritage and see that it survives for generations to come. If you would like to become a sponsor, please email info@fhl.org or call 225.387.2464. Thank you for your support!

Champion - $10,000

  • Logo featured in all media promotions and print materials, including Foundation’s website
  • Recognition in each quarterly Foundation newsletter with one feature article annually
  • Your name or logo printed on Foundation Sponsor banner at Old Governor’s Mansion
  • Twenty (20) tickets to the 9th Annual Old Governor’s Mansion Gala, October 25
  • Limited edition Sponsor keepsake gift
  • Reserved VIP tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion for you and your guests for one year
  • Annual Foundation Membership

Supporter - $7,500

  • Name featured in all media promotions and print materials
  • Recognition in each quarterly Foundation newsletter with one feature article annually
  • Your name or logo printed on Foundation Sponsor banner at Old Governor’s Mansion
  • Twelve (12) tickets to the 9th Annual Old Governor’s Mansion Gala. October 25
  • Limited edition Sponsor keepsake gift
  • Reserved VIP tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion for you and your guests for one year
  • Annual Foundation Membership

Investor - $5,000

  • Recognition in each quarterly Foundation newsletter
  • Your name or logo printed on Foundation Sponsor banner at Old Governor’s Mansion
  • Ten (10) tickets to the 9th Annual Old Governor’s Mansion Gala, October 25
  • Limited edition Sponsor keepsake gift
  • Reserved VIP tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion for you and your guests for one year
  • Annual Foundation Membership

Benefactor - $2,500

  • Recognition in each quarterly Foundation newsletter
  • Your name or logo printed on Foundation Sponsor banner at Old Governor’s Mansion
  • Eight (8) tickets to the 9th Annual Old Governor’s Mansion Gala, October 25
  • Limited edition Sponsor keepsake gift
  • Reserved VIP tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion for you and your guests for one year
  • Annual Foundation Membership

Patron - $1,500

  • Recognition in each quarterly Foundation newsletter
  • Your name or logo printed on Foundation Sponsor banner at Old Governor’s Mansion
  • Six (6) tickets to the 9th Annual Old Governor’s Mansion Gala, October 25
  • Limited edition Sponsor keepsake gift
  • Annual Foundation Membership

Current Sponsors

Saved!

Today due in great part to the Foundation’s long standing efforts, our citizens enjoy many historic gems. Community leaders and elected officials now share a greater awareness of the critical importance of our landmarks. It’s the catalyzing work of the Foundation that spearheads initiatives such as the Heidelberg Hotel/Capitol House "comeback" and the restorations along Third Street. Recent victories include the creation of a Historic Preservation Commission and passage of a demolition ordinance. Over the years from 1963-2004, the Foundation has protected Magnolia Mound, the Louisiana State Capitol, the Pentagon Barracks, Historic Highland and Magnolia Cemeteries, the classic LSU campus buildings, Spanish Town and Beauregard Town Historic Districts, and most recently the Old Governor’s Mansion. The work of safeguarding our patrimony is never ending and certainly never complete.

Current Exhibition

In conjunctionw with this year's Gala celebrating the 200th anniversary of the incorporation of Baton Rouge, Preserve Louisiana presents:

Baton Rouge: The Past 200 Years, A Photographic Retrospective

Baton Rouge: The Past 200 Years is a stunning visual compilation of charming imagery and poignant moments in our city’s history. In honor of the city of Baton Rouge’s bicentennial of incorporation in 1817, this exhibition explores the history of Baton Rouge by illustrating nostalgic images from the past, set in the present. The resulting image is often a new story that altogether laments difficult losses and celebrates cherished historical memories. 

On view through February, 2017

Upcoming exhibitions:

Junior League Retrospective Celebrating 80 Years on view March 20th - June

Lost & Found: Theatres of Louisiana on view July - October 1st

Treasures in Trouble

Preserve Louisiana's Past "Treasures in Trouble" 
 Endangered Properties List

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana (FHL) named endangered historic properties and entities, calling them "treasures in trouble," to draw attention to their potential loss. FHL designated five properties in the Greater Baton Rouge region, as well one grouping of New Orleans Lower Mid-City Historic District homes moved from the swath of construction for the new medical center, as endangered treasures and in need of advocacy efforts to preserve.

Named are the Livingston Parish Courthouse, circa 1940; First Guaranty Bank of Ponchatoula, a mid-20th century modern building designed by renowned Louisiana architect John Desmond; True Friends Hall in Donaldsonville, circa 1886; The Royal Hotel in Amite, circa 1900; the Laurel Street Firehouse, circa 1940; and dozens of moved homes originally located in the National Register Lower Mid-City Historic District of New Orleans and intended for recycling.

These Treasures in Trouble were selected predominately from the nine parish capital region that includes Ascension, Livingston, and Tangipahoa. Nominations came from citizens concerned about preservation and each entry is architecturally and culturally significant, said former Treasures in Trouble Chair Mark Drennen. Also serving on the committee are Lenore Feeney, Robert Hodges, Doug Cochran, Sandra Stokes, Mark Upton, Michael Desmond, PhD., along with the FHL professional staff.

"The Treasures in Trouble recognition draws attention to these unique properties that are so important to their communities. Each property represents a tie to the history, architectural, and cultural story of its location. Additionally FHL will bring together individuals and organizations from the various parishes to develop a business plan of action for each named property. "Spotlighting these neglected and sometimes forgotten properties is the first step in bringing them back into commerce and showcasing their full potential and possibilities for economic development," stated Doug Cochran, FHL Board Member.

Other Treasures in Trouble from past years include: St. Paul’s Church in Bayou Goula, the LSU Huey P. Long Pool, the Bucky Geodesic Dome, the Lincoln Theater, and The Marston House.

Staff Members

Fairleigh Cook Jackson
Executive Director
fairleighjackson@fhl.org

Fairleigh Jackson joined Preserve Louisiana as the orgnaziation's second Executive Director in September 2015. She has a 10 year record of service to area and statewide non-profit organizations, including serving as director of Member Services for the Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations. She has also served as a director of Advancement with the LSU Museum of Art and director for the Community Fund for the Arts. She is a graduate of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber's Leadership Program, Dialogue on Race Louisiana, and a recipient of the Baton Rouge Business Report's Top 40 Under Forty. She is co-owner of the Creative Bloc, a newly rehabilitated mid-century building on Main Street in Baton Rouge that now houses a collective of creatives in a collaborative work environment. Fairleigh serves on the board of directors of the Mid City Redevelopment Alliance and the Louisiana State Museums.

Natalie Mault Mead
Director of Education, Old Governor's Mansion Curator
natalie@fhl.org

Natalie Mead joined the FHL staff in January 2016. She works with docents, volunteers, staff, FHL members and tourism officials at FHL headquarters in the Old Governor's Mansion. Mead joins FHL as a professional curator, museum educator, author and lecturer. Natalie previously worked with the LSU Museum of Art, Louisiana Department of Economic Development, the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, and the Louisiana Art and Science Museum. Mead has had over fifteen years of experience in the museum world, with more than a decade dedicated to the curatorial field. Between 2005 and 2014, she worked as the Curator at the LSU Museum of Art, where she organized and curated numerous exhibitions focusing on American art, specifically Southern art and history. In 2013, Mead received the inaugural ADAA Foundation Curatorial Award from the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) and Association of Art Museum Curators, honoring exceptional curatorial visions. Her curatorial achievements were also recognized in 2009, with the Louisiana Association of Museum’s Emerging Museum Professional Award.

Allie Wester

Events Director

alliewester@fhl.org

Roderick Scott
Tax Credits, Flood Mitigation Specialist & Special Projects
info@fhl.org

Lynda Hargroder
Docent and Volunteer Liaison
lyndahargroder@fhl.org

Lynda Hargroder is a longtime FHL Board Member and volunteer now serving as FHL/The Old Governor's Masnion Docent and Volunteer Liason. She served as Interim Executive Director during the summer of 2015. Mrs. Hargroder has been involved with the Foundation for more than 10 years.

Selena Grant
Foundation Shops Manager
Extension 200
selenagrant@fhl.org

Ms. Selena Grant has been managing the Foundation’s museum shops, located in the State Capitol and the Capitol Park Museum, since 2001. From right here in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Grant spent time studying at Dillard University, The University of Tennessee and Southern University. Before working with FHL, Selena spent 33 years working as a legal secretary for the Louisiana Department of Education. She spends time working with her church providing outreach to the Brookstown area. Grant loves everything about Louisiana especially the culture, the food, the people, the football and the fact that Louisianans’ take so much pride in their state.

Maleiya Porter-Jones
Public Relations Intern
PRintern@fhl.org 

Sara Elizabeth Hill 

Special Events Intern

Events@fhl.org

Sara Elizabeth Hill joined the Preserve Louisiana staff in August 2016. Originally from Shreveport, she is currently a senior at LSU pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication with a minor in business administration. 

Angela deGravelles

Public Relations

prpro@eatel.net

Executive Director’s Message

Dear Preserve Louisiasna members, volunteers, and constituents:

Can it really be since 1963 that the Foundation for Historical Louisiana Board of Directors, staff, and volunteers have been working with fervor to protect, preserve, and promote what is important to all of us-Louisiana’s historical heritage, architecture, and culture? I am honored to be in the company of such dedicated friends and colleagues. Now, we move into the next iteration of our invaluable organziation as Preserve Louisiana, the new "doing business as" name for The Foundation for Historical Louisiana. After much discussion (years of discussion!), focus groups, brand studies, mission consideration, and surveying of our colleagues around the country with similar missions, we are more than pleased with the adoption of this new name.

Preserve Louisiana's mission has not changed, we hope to only strengthen our mission as we move forward, to promote the preservation of the cultural and architectual heritae of Louisiana through education, advocacy and stewardship.

Each year, we must turn to you for critical, sustaining support. Your donation of $100, $500, $1,000 or $5,000 can make all the difference and is fully tax-deductible. Please help make these accomplishments continue with your contribution. FHL’s current activities include:

  • Advocating and supporting the historic preservation tax credit legislation--an economic development tool;
  •  Monthly Heritage Lectures, quarterly Lagniappe Lectures and Preservation Salons;
  • Our annual Preservation Awards - celebrating preservation accomplishments of our friends and organizations around the State;
  • Key meetings and convenings of our partners in preservation accross the state including The Louisiana Trust for Historic Preservation, The Preservation REsource Center in New Orleans and our state SHPO office;
  • Official partners with Washington, DC based National Trust for Historic Preservation and Preservation Action;
  • Offering cultural and architectural preservation curriculum to K- 12 thanks to a grant from the Lamar Family Foundation
  • Rotating exhibitions focused on our rich history, preservation wins and losses, and the cultural talents of our state;
  • Engaging members in preservation through our cultural and architectural tours, Preserve Louisiana Tours;
  • Continuing our efforts to remain great stewards of our home, The Old Governor's Mansion


You are a key member of this dynamic preservation family through your donations and your belief in our mission. At this time, we sincerely hope that you will consider a generous year-end contribution.

Membership dues and our many fundraising endeavors at the Mansion are not enough to support all of the work Preserve Louisiana has before it. Our organziation is not funded by a federal, state, or city budget line.  Every year we must raise our annual operations budget.  In this uncertain economic time, Preserve Louisiana counts on your support - now more than ever. Preserve Louisiana is a 501 (c) 3, not-for-profit organization. Thank you so much for your help.

All the best,

Fairleigh Cook Jackson

Executive Director
 

Board Of Directors

Preserve Louisiana is a privately funded organization governed by a Board of volunteers from throughout the community. Our directors and officers represent all aspects of Baton Rouge’s diverse cultural, socio-economic, and professional make up. They are elected by the membership and serve various term lengths. Members also serve on other boards including the Louisiana State Museum Board, Baton Rouge Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the East Baton Rouge Parish Historic Preservation Commission.

Bergeron, Myrna
Cochran, Doug
Davis, Nedra
Eastin, Melissa
Emanuel, Rachel
Graves, Cynthia
Hanley, Melanie
Hargroder, Lynda
Hobdy, Donovan
Kilpatrick, Kerry
LaNasa, Whitney
Levy, Gus
Major,  Claire H. 
Salomon, Martha
Spurlock, Vicki
Upton, Mark
Wilbert, Jacob
Jackson, Fairleigh (executive director)
* denotes officer

Contact Information

We'd love to hear from you!

Physical Address
Preservation Headquarters
Old Governor’s Mansion • 502 North Boulevard
Baton Rouge, LA 70802

Mailing Address
Preserve Louisiana
PO Box 908
Baton Rouge, LA 70821

Phone 225.387.2464 • Fax 225.343.3989  •  info@fhl.org • 

Get Involved

Foundation Members Make it Happen!

From the remarkable restoration of River Road’s Magnolia Mound Plantation to our current stewardship project of Louisiana’s Old Governor’s Mansion, the Foundation for Historical Louisiana brings the rich heritage of the past to vivid life in the present.

Since its chartering in 1963, the Foundation has been successful due to the membership and endorsement of generous and dedicated supporters just like you!

There is still much to safeguard around our heritage-rich state: Main Street historic districts that continue to suffer demolition, historic school buildings, commercial and residential National Register properties that need immediate restoration work and adaptive planning for the 21st Century.

Together, we can make a difference that will endure and preserve the past for future generations! Become a Foundation Member today!

Foundation members enjoy:

  • Free Admission to the Old Governor’s Mansion
  • 10 % discount in Old Governor’s Mansion West Wing Gift Shop, the CapitolPark Museum Store and the Shop at the Top of the New State Capitol
  • Invitations to all Foundation programs and events, including Heritage Lectures, Preservation Workshops, and THE party of the year, our Annual Old Governor’s Mansion Gala
  • Advance notice and reduced fares for all Lagniappe Tours excursions
  • The satisfaction of helping preserve the cultural and architectural heritage of Louisiana AND the opportunity to work actively for historic preservation causes throughout the state.

If you would prefer to join FHL offline, please call 225-387-2464 or print and 
mail this form with your payment.

Sponsors

Preserve Louisiana invites you to become a preservation partner! As an underwriter, you will be honored throughout the full year. Your donation will return solid marketing advantages in addition to being tax deductible, as the Foundation is a 501 (c)(3), not for profit organization.

The Great Company You'd Join

How to Become a Partner

Resources

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana strives to preserve the cultural and architectural heritage of our state through advocacy, stewardship, and most importantly, education. Endless resources and programs are available to those interested in saving our rich and unique culture.

Louisiana Cultural Districts

Louisiana Main Street Program

National Register of Historic Places

Historic Preservation Tax Incentives

National Preservation Organizations

Louisiana Preservation Organizations

Research Resources

Old Governors’s Mansion

$10 per person pre-registered & $15 night of event. Cocktails and appetizers will be served!

Thursday, August 18, 2016
6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

The Old Governor's Mansion
502 North Boulevard
Baton Rouge, LA 70802

Or Pre-register online or 225-387-2464

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana is proud to offer a variety of tours for the enrichment of its members, schoolchildren, and the public.

Information for these tours can be found here:

Lagniappe Tours
Old Governor's Mansion
School Tours

For additional information or to schedule a tour, call us at 225-387-2464.

What We Do

For more than 50 years, the Preserve Louisiana (The Foundation for Historical Louisiana) has protected Magnolia Mound, the Louisiana State Capitol, the Pentagon Barracks, Historic Highland and Magnolia Cemeteries, the classic LSU campus buildings, Spanish Town and Beauregard Town Historic Districts, and the Old Governor’s Mansion. Most recently, Preserve Louisiana was instrumental in the development of a historic demolition ordinance for the downtown area and the creation of a Historic Preservation Commission. The work of safeguarding our patrimony is never ending and certainly never complete.

Who We Are

The Foundation for Historical Louisiana was founded in November of 1963 with the purpose of promoting local interest in the heritage of Baton Rouge and the state of Louisiana. The Foundation uses the resources of today to preserve the treasures of yesterday and improve the quality of tomorrow. 

Our aim is to promote cultural awareness and to encourage economic growth that revitalizes our communities. We seek to unite community leaders, business people, historians, teachers, and preservationists in a coalition approach to historic education and preservation advocacy.

The mission of the Foundation for Historical Louisiana is to promote the preservation of the cultural and architectural heritage of Louisiana through education, advocacy, and stewardship.

In September of 2016, the board of directors voted to adopt a new "doing business as" name for our organization, Preserve Louisiana. Our mission remains the same and as we move forward, the organization is proud to be referred to as Preserve Louisiana or PLA.

Home



The Foundation for Historical Louisiana is a member-based, educational nonprofit organization committed to protecting the state’s cultural and architectural heritage. For more than 50 years, FHL and its dedicated supporters have worked to preserve historic landmarks, including their own headquarters, The Old Governor’s Mansion; Magnolia Mound, Heidelberg Hotel, Baton Rouge High School, East Feliciana Courthouse and countless homes and architectural treasures throughout Louisiana. Today, FHL’s efforts include educational programming, historic documentation and tax credit consulting as well as preservation advocacy as a tool for community economic development. FHL is a Local Partner of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.